Panda Express

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We drove past a Panda Express two days ago on our way to Target, and it reminded me that I wanted Chinese food. So after a quick search for their allergen menu (I found one at http://www.projectallergy.com/documents/AllergyInformation.pdf ), I decided to stop there and get cake and I some lunch. Since we avoid milk and nuts, he had plenty of choices. (Note: he hasn’t had any major issues with cross contamination at most restaurants). I got us chow mein and chicken with mushrooms to share and some orange chicken for myself (we avoid orange and citrus with Cake). I also bought 3 potstickers to share. Cake loved the pot stickers (he has never, ever liked pot stickers any other time I’ve gotten them for him), thought the chow mein was “okay”, and didn’t like the chicken and mushrooms.

Even though there’s a likelyhood of cross contamination, I’m glad I was able to find a Chinese food place for us to go to.

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Ingredients in ‘dried mango’ apparently contain a lot of allergens!

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I bought some dried mango slices from whole foods. The ingredients? Mango slices, sugar (see picture). Then, in all capital letters ‘may contain: peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, and soy.’

Really? They really needed to write that their 2-ingredient item may contain 6 top allergens? They didn’t feel the need to include fish and shellfish in the list, apparently.

I get that there’s no *official* policy on the ‘may contain’ label for foods, and that companies are just trying to cover themselves in case of a reaction, or that the label may mean it’s manufactured in the same factory as those foods, or whatever. But these type of labels make me think twice about buying products for my food allergic toddler. However, with just 2 ingredients in the label it’s doubtful that any of those other ingredients actually exist in the product and I ended up buying it (Cake was totally fine eating it).

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